Building Industry Consultative Council

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The Building Industry Consultative Council (BICC) was established in 2001 as a high-level advisory council to the Minister for Industrial Relations. It is made up of employers, industry associations, unions and government.

The BICC advises the Minister on economic and industrial relations issues affecting the building and construction industry.

The BICC also engages with state government agencies about the skill requirements and training needs of the building and construction industry.

Members

The BICC is chaired by Peter Parkinson, an experienced industrial relations and human resources practitioner who has held senior positions with employers, unions and peak bodies.

Mr Parkinson is also Chair of the Victorian Building Industry Disputes Panel, which deals with industrial issues affecting the Victorian building and construction industry and plays a central role in dispute resolution.

The BICC is made up of members from the following organisations:

  • Multiplex
  • CEPU – Electrical Division
  • CEPU – Electrical Division
  • CFMEU – Construction and General Division
  • CFMEU - Forestry and Furnishing Products Division
  • Lend Lease
  • Probuild
  • Master Builders Association of Victoria
  • Air Conditioning and Mechanical Contractors' Association
  • PETU – Plumbing Division
  • Master Plumbers and Mechanical Services Association of Australia
  • National Electrical and Communications Association, Victorian Chapter
  • National Fire Industry Association
  • Property Council of Australia
  • Victorian Trades Hall Council
  • WorkSafe
  • Development Victoria
  • Office of Projects Victoria
  • Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning
Introduction Text
This advisory council to the Minister for Industrial Relations is made up of employers, industry associations, unions and government.
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Transport Industry Council

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The Transport Industry Council was set up under the Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Act 2005.

The Council is responsible for making recommendations to the Minister for Industrial Relations on commercial practices affecting owner drivers. It advises on:

  • the content of codes of practice, rates and costs schedules and information provided to owner drivers
  • the development, publication and promotion of model contracts
  • any other matters relevant to owner driver contracts and the commercial practices generally engaged in by owner drivers and hirers in relation to each other

The Transport Industry Council consists of an independent chairperson and nine members appointed by the Minister for Industrial Relations, including:

  • One person nominated by VicRoads (non-voting member)
  • One person nominated by the Victorian Employers' Chamber of Commerce and Industry
  • One person nominated by the Australian Industry Group
  • Two persons nominated by the Victorian Trades Hall Council
  • Two persons nominated by the Victorian Transport Association
  • Two persons nominated by the Transport Workers Union
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The Transport Industry Council is made up of members from industry and employee associations and government.
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Forestry Industry Council

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The Forestry Industry Council was established under the Owner Drivers and Forestry Contractors Act 2005.

The Council is responsible for making recommendations to the Minister for Industrial Relations on commercial practices affecting forestry contractors. It advises on:

  • the content of codes of practice, rates and costs schedules, and other information for contractors
  • the development, publication and promotion of model contracts
  • any other matters relevant to harvesting and haulage contracts, and the commercial practices generally engaged in by forestry contractors and hirers in relation to each other

The Forestry Industry Council consists of an independent chairperson and the following nine members appointed by the Minister for Industrial Relations:

  • One member nominated by the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (non-voting member)
  • One person nominated by the Victorian Association of Forest Industries
  • One person nominated by the Australian Forest Products Association
  • Two persons nominated by the Australian Forest Contractors Association
  • Two persons nominated by the Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union
  • Two persons nominated by VicForests
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The Forestry Industry Council is made up of members from industry, contractor and employee associations, and government.
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Victorian Government Call Centre Policy

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The Victorian Government has created a Call Centre Code to help people understand their responsibilities in relation to the call centre industry.

The Code outlines legal obligations and provides guidance on industry best practice.

The Code sets out:

  • employee minimum entitlements
  • occupational health and safety
  • anti-discrimination
  • management and organisation of work
  • compliance – monitoring and sanctions

Call Centre Code considerations

The Code applies to government call centres and private sector call centre service providers contracted to the Victorian Government.

The Victorian Government encourages all industry participants within the call centre industry to adopt and adhere to the Code.

The Call Centre Code sets out a framework for government buyers to assess whether businesses have satisfied the requirements of the Code.

The Code must be included in all invitations-to-supply documents. Compliance with the Code is a mandatory consideration when evaluating a supplier's response.

To ensure businesses supplying call centre services to the Victorian Government are complying with the Code, suppliers are required to lodge a completed Checklist for Compliance with the Call Centre Code, including a signed Declaration of Compliance with their offer.

 

 

Compliance with the Code is a condition of any contract in which a private sector organisation provides call centre services to the Victorian Government. A model clause has been developed and must be included in all procurement contracts. This clause creates a binding contractual obligation on the supplier to comply with the Code.

 

 

Need help?

Industrial Relations Victoria can provide information and assistance about the Victorian Government Call Centre Policy.

Email: irv.info@dpc.vic.gov.au

Victorian Government Call Centre Code

The Call Centre Code has been developed to assist people to understand the Victoria Government's requirements and expectations for the call centre industry.
Introduction Text
The Victorian Government aims to ensure that call centre work is carried out fairly, efficiently and safely.
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Report Ancestral Remains

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All Aboriginal Ancestral Remains must be reported to the Council in accordance with the Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006.

Reporting Aboriginal Ancestral Remains ensures that these Ancestors can be returned to rest on Country.

Discoveries of human remains

Recent discoveries of human remains must be reported to the Coroner or a police officer in charge of a police station. This can be done by contacting Coronial Admissions and Enquiries on 1300 309 519.

Submit a report

If you have in your possession or know of the location of Aboriginal Ancestral Remains, you'll need to report this to us as soon as possible.

Contact the Council's Ancestral Remains Unit to make a report:

Phone: 03 7004 7209 or 0437 956 520

Email: ancestral.remains.unit@dpc.vic.gov.au

Information required

Whether you are contacting the Coroner, police officer or the Ancestral Remains Unit, try and provide as much information as possible about the context of where the Aboriginal Ancestral Remains are located. For example:

  • are they in someone’s house and part of an old collection, 
  • are they possibly in their original burial place,
  • are there any other Aboriginal objects,
  • are you in an area of known burial grounds?

This information will assist them to advise you what to do next.

It is important to not touch or move the Aboriginal Ancestral Remains.

Out of respect for the Traditional Owners, do not contact the media.

A close up and in focus photograph (with something for a scale e.g. coin, matchbox, ruler, fingertip) of the exposed bone may help in identification.

Traditional Owners reporting Ancestral Remains

Traditional Owners must report any human remains to the Coroner. However they are exempt from also reporting Aboriginal Ancestral Remains to the Council, if they:

  • are the rightful owner of Aboriginal Ancestral Remains
  • believe that transferring Remains to the Council is against Aboriginal tradition.

For assistance with these reporting requirements, Traditional Owners can contact Council’s Ancestral Remains Unit.

Phone: 03 7004 7209

Email: ancestral.remains.unit@dpc.vic.gov.au

 

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Aboriginal Ancestral Remains (Ancestors) should be owned by and returned to Traditional Owners of the area from which they are believed to have come from.
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Repatriation of Ancestral Remains

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Identifying where the Ancestral Remains came from

So that Council can respond quickly to reports of Aboriginal Ancestral Remains, they have established Ancestral Remains Advisory Committees (ARACs). An ARAC decides whether the Aboriginal Ancestral Remains need to be transferred to Council. If they are transferred, they are then:

  • transferred to the relevant Traditional Owner, or
  • transferred to Museums Victoria, or
  • an appropriate course of action is determined by the ARAC (this may be to undertake further research to identify who the right Traditional Owners are).

Working with Traditional Owners to return the Ancestors to Country

Council makes decisions about which Traditional Owners to return the Ancestral Remains to. Council’s Ancestral Remains Unit works with these Traditional Owners to return the Ancestors to Country. Together they ensure the Traditional Owners' needs are met and helps with the ongoing management of these burial places.

The Victorian state government has provided Council with a one-off grant for the current financial year to assist communities in the repatriation of their Ancestors. We are hopeful of continued funding.

Each repatriation is unique as the needs of the different Traditional Owners. Working through grief, anger and cultural sensitivities as well as the logistics of burial and repatriation ceremonies, is a long process that can take years. Throughout the process, the commitment to return the Ancestors to rest on Country guides everyone.

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Repatriation of Aboriginal Ancestral Remains is guided by a commitment to return the Ancestors to rest on Country by all involved.
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Public sector enterprise bargaining and wages policy

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Enterprise bargaining

Industrial Relations Victoria helps departments, agencies and unions with industrial relations matters and enterprise bargaining. It ensures that consistent advice is given to employers and stakeholders, and that public sector employers are familiar with their obligations under the Government industrial relations policies.

Industrial Relations Victoria is a resource that parties can draw on to assist in the bargaining process. Its role is to:

  • oversee bargaining across the public sector
  • assist in bargaining negotiations to help parties find workable solutions and avoid disputes
  • help to resolve disputes between parties

Current enterprise bargaining agreements

Find an enterprise agreement (Fair Work Commission)

Victorian Public Service Enterprise Agreement 2016

Public Sector Industrial Relations Policies 2015

The Victorian Government has published policies on a number of important public sector industrial relations matters.

This policy document will be updated soon to reflect changes made by the Government's new Wages Policy.

Government Wages Policy

A new Wages Policy applies to the Victorian public sector from 17 April 2019. It revokes and replaces the previous wages policy and guidance material.

To support the revised Wages Policy, and to improve the Government approval process, a new enterprise bargaining framework has been developed.

Departments and agencies should contact Industrial Relations Victoria if they need guidance throughout this transition.

Introduction Text
Industrial Relations Victoria helps departments, agencies and unions with industrial relations matters and enterprise bargaining.
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Wages Policy and the Enterprise Bargaining Framework

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Message from Tim Pallas MP, Treasurer of Victoria and Minister for Industrial Relations

The Government has made significant investments in social and economic reforms. It has invested in education and skills, improved healthcare, built new schools and hospitals, invested in public transport and roads, created more jobs for Victorians and made our community safer and fairer. The Government also delivered measures to protect workers’ rights and entitlements.

The Government has committed to continuing this ambitious program of reform in its current term and has revised its Wages Policy to support the continuation of this investment.

The new Wages Policy applies from Wednesday, 17 April 2019. It revokes and replaces the previous wages policy and guidance material.

To support the revised Wages Policy, and to improve the Government approval process, a new enterprise bargaining framework has been developed.

Both the Wages Policy and the Enterprise Bargaining Framework aim to encourage public sector agencies to take a more strategic approach to enterprise bargaining, focused on the Government’s operational and public sector priorities that deliver real benefits for the public sector and for all Victorians.

The new Wages Policy and Enterprise Bargaining Framework continue and build upon the Government’s collaborative approach to enterprise negotiations from its last term. Public sector employees and their unions are important and valued partners in the delivery of important services to Victorians. Further, public sector agencies play an important role in promoting best practice employment practices to the wider community.

Public Sector Priorities

Over its previous term, the Government made significant investments in public sector service delivery and the value of our public sector workforce. To reflect and build on these important initiatives the Government has identified key Public Sector Priorities for this term.

From the Public Reform Statement 2016

  • Outcomes: Focusing on what matters and getting it done
  • Systems: Designing integrated systems to solve problems
  • People: Empowering a capable and collaborative workforce
  • Accountability: Holding ourselves to a higher standard

Public Sector Priorities

Deliver exceptional services and value for Victorians:

  • deliver service efficiencies
  • financial sustainability
  • prioritise resources for the Government’s social agenda

A professional and responsive public sector:

  • people-centric
  • increase workforce mobility
  • build skills and capability
  • responsive to the community
  • trustworthy and committed

Government as a fair and best practice employer:

  • increase diversity
  • promote gender equity
  • ensure access to flexible working arrangements
  • maintain preference for secure employment
  • reduce labour hire

There are a range of tools available to deliver these priorities, including legislation, policy and operational practice. Enterprise bargaining is one important tool.

The Government’s Wages Policy has been set to encourage public sector agencies to reflect these Public Sector Priorities in their operational practice.

Wages Policy

The primary pathway for agreement-making under Government’s new Wages Policy has three pillars.

Pillar 1: Wages

Increases in wages and conditions will be capped at a rate of growth of 2.0% per annum over the life of the agreement. In practice this means employee wages and conditions will be allowed to grow at this rate.

Pillar 2: Best Practice Employment Commitment

All public sector agencies will be required to make a Best Practice Employment Commitment which will outline measures to operationalise elements of the Government’s Public Sector Priorities that reflect good practice within Government and can be implemented operationally or without significant costs.

Pillar 3: Additional strategic changes

Additional changes to allowances and other conditions (not general wages) will only be allowed if Government agrees that the changes will address key operational or strategic priorities for the agency, and/or one or more of the Public Sector Priorities.

In addition, Wages Policy requires that:

  • all agreements must be fiscally sustainable and fully funded from capped indexation, revenue and/or appropriate cost offsets
  • enterprise agreements must not contain retrospective payments. This means that the first pay increase in any agreement must be forward looking and cannot be prior to the date the agreement has been submitted to the Government for approval
  • legislated increases to the superannuation guarantee rate are excluded from the cap on wages and conditions
  • public sector agencies should seek to achieve four-year agreements subject to operational considerations
  • public sector agencies must seek pre-approval from Government to make any offer above the capped growth rate

Further information about Wages Policy Pillars 2 and 3 is outlined below.

Best Practice Employment Commitment

Several of the Government’s key public sector reforms such as improving gender equity, ensuring secure employment and access to flexible working arrangements can be enhanced through changes to operational practices and policies.

Public sector agencies are required to identify and action reforms around public sector employment through a Best Practice Employment Commitment (BPEC) to be finalised alongside the enterprise agreement.

The BPEC must include measures for implementing best practice employment practices, to operationalise elements of the Government’s Public Sector Priorities that reflect good practice elsewhere within Government and can be implemented operationally or without significant costs. These measures will need to be tailored to the public sector agency’s circumstances.

Government will set the framework for what can be contained in the BPEC through the Industrial Relations Policy. This will include matters such as:

  • a commitment to regular gender auditing, and reporting and efforts to identify and address gender pay gaps in the public sector organisation
  • facilitating access to flexible working arrangements
  • secure employment initiatives to reduce inappropriate use of casual, fixed term and labour hire, including workforce planning and preparations
  • skills and capability development to develop a mobile and agile public sector workforce
  • supporting the continued development of whole of government policies by considering further measures to address anti-bullying, gender equity and diversity, mental health, occupational health and safety, and family violence

The BPEC is not expected to contain significant cost items. These items would instead be considered under Pillar 3.

Public sector agencies should work with public sector unions and employees to develop their BPEC as bargaining progresses and to identify the actions to progress these matters.

Additional strategic changes to address key operational reforms or the Public Sector Priorities.

Operational or strategic priorities will differ across public sector agencies depending on the challenges they face. Higher cost outcomes linked to a key operational reform or the Public Sector Priorities could include, for example:

  • addressing high instances of unscheduled absences on weekends and nights by increasing penalty rates for these shifts or amending rostering practices
  • amending opening hours to provide incentives to employees who work expanded hours to ensure services are available at times convenient to the community
  • removing or reducing restrictions which impede the efficient allocation of resources
  • addressing identified skill or capability gaps and incentivising and facilitating employees’ skill development through access to specified TAFE training
  • specific measures to address gender inequity (for example, additional parental leave, payment of superannuation during periods of parental leave)
  • targeted wage increases to a specific and identifiable cohort of workforce who have historically been underpaid because of gender (for example, through reclassification of a particular feminised role)

Secondary pathway

The Government has designed Wages Policy to encourage public sector agencies to take a more strategic approach to enterprise bargaining. However, Government recognises that for various reasons, some bargaining parties may prefer to agree to a wage increase in a new enterprise agreement without disrupting any terms and conditions agreed during their previous bargaining round.

Accordingly, a limited secondary pathway is available under Wages Policy for public sector agencies and unions who agree in principle ahead of bargaining that they seek to reach agreement expeditiously on this basis.

The secondary pathway is available only to public sector agencies whose current agreement reaches its nominal expiry date on or before 30 June 2020.

The secondary pathway permits agreements to be made only on the following terms:

  • one annual wage and allowance increase capped at 2.5% (half-yearly increases up to the capped rate also permissible, for example 2 x 1.25% increases in six-monthly instalments)
  • a nominal expiry date 12 months from the nominal expiry date of the current agreement
  • all other terms and conditions as contained in the current agreement, except for where a change is required under the Industrial Relations Policy, to further mutually agreed whole-of-Government initiatives, to resolve legal issues, or minor changes to improve the clarity of the Agreement

In addition:

  • public sector agencies must comply with Fair Work Act 2009 (Fair Work Act) good faith bargaining requirements
  • all agreements must be fiscally sustainable and fully funded from capped indexation, revenue and/or appropriate cost offsets
  • public sector agencies must meet the timelines prescribed in the Enterprise Bargaining Framework
  • public sector agencies using this pathway may also produce a BPEC where agreed with employees and relevant unions, or otherwise are expected to comply with the Government’s policy requirements

Enterprise Bargaining Framework

The Enterprise Bargaining Framework (Framework) describes the Government’s approval arrangements which public sector agencies must meet before commencing bargaining, during bargaining and before seeking employee approval of final enterprise agreements.

The Framework applies equally where a public sector agency seeks to vary an existing enterprise agreement under the Fair Work Act.

Major and Non-major Agreements

The Framework places different bargaining and governance expectations on different types of public sector agencies relative to the size of their workforce, wages bill, and relative industrial or financial risk profile. The Framework prescribes two categories of enterprise agreement – Major Agreements and Non-major Agreements.

Major Agreements

Major Agreements include any enterprise agreement:

  • with a large public sector workforce, with a salary base in excess of $1 billion
  • with significant industrial or financial risk
  • of strategic or operational importance to Government

Major Agreements include those covering the public service, teachers, police, firefighters, paramedics and major public health sector agreements (including those covering nurses, doctors, allied health professionals, medical scientists and health and allied services, management and administrative employees) as well as other agreements as the circumstances dictate.

The Government will oversee and approve the strategy and negotiations for all Major Agreements.

Non-major Agreements

Non-major Agreements generally cover smaller components of the public sector workforce and carry fewer financial or industrial risks. Any enterprise agreement not classified as a Major Agreement will be treated as a Non-major Agreement for the purpose of this Framework.

When negotiating enterprise agreements, public sector agencies must adhere to the processes and requirements outlined in the Framework applicable to the enterprise agreement to be negotiated.

Where a public sector agency or Portfolio Department is unsure whether an enterprise agreement should be classified as a Major Agreement or Non-major Agreement they should contact Industrial Relations Victoria (IRV).

Early engagement

Negotiations between public sector agencies and bargaining representatives should commence six months prior to the nominal expiry date of the current agreement.

To ensure public sector agencies are in a position to commence bargaining in a timely fashion and without unnecessary delays, internal preparations for bargaining should commence no later than 12 months in advance of the nominal expiry date of the current agreement. This approach will ensure bargaining strategies and proposals for change can be developed with sufficient time to allow for necessary Government oversight prior to the commencement of bargaining.

Table 1: Indicative bargaining preparation timeline

Task Approximate timeframe Action owner
Initial discussion between public sector agency, Portfolio Department, IRV and the Department of Treasury and Finance (DTF) 12 months prior to nominal expiry date Public sector agency
Portfolio Department
IRV
DTF
Draft bargaining approval documents to be submitted to Portfolio Department for approval 9 months prior to nominal expiry date Public sector agency
Portfolio Department
Review proposed bargaining approval documents 8 months prior to nominal expiry date IRV
DTF
Bargaining approval documents submitted to Government for approval 7-8 months prior to nominal expiry date Public sector agency
Portfolio Department
Authority to commence bargaining communicated to public sector agency 6 months prior to nominal expiry date IRV
Bargaining commences 6 months prior to the nominal expiry date Public sector agency

Authority to commence bargaining

Prior to commencing bargaining, public sector agencies are required to seek approval from Government and, and for those bargaining under the primary pathway, submit their proposed Best Practice Employment Commitment for approval.

To obtain the authority to bargain the public sector agency is required to provide information about their workforce demographics, bargaining history and proposed content of a new agreement (please contact your Portfolio Department or IRV for information on the form of the approval submission). Preliminary costings may be required.

The level of detail required in completing the template will reflect the public sector agency’s size, wage base and be commensurate with the financial and industrial implications of the proposed agreement.

Eligible public sector agencies seeking authority to commence bargaining under the secondary pathway must provide written confirmation to Government of in-principle support of any public sector union(s) to be covered by the proposed agreement for this course of action.

Table 2: Authority to commence bargaining – Key responsibilities

Responsibility Action owner
Preparation of submission to Government (Major Agreements) Portfolio Department
Completion of Template (Non-major Agreements) Public sector agency
Portfolio Department
Direct Engagement with public sector agency (if needed) Portfolio Department
Public sector agency
IRV and DTF (as required)
Advice on Enterprise Bargaining Framework or application of Industrial Relations Policy IRV
Advice on proposed measures to address operational/strategic priorities or the Public Sector Priorities IRV
DTF
Advice on Wages Policy, cost modelling or financial sustainability issues DTF
Authority, oversight and approval Government, with appropriate authorisations for some Non-major Agreements

During bargaining

Public sector agencies must keep their Portfolio Department, IRV and DTF informed about the progress of bargaining, particularly where industrial or financial risks emerge. In some cases, this may require further consideration by Government.

Public sector agencies cannot make offers during bargaining outside approved parameters without the offer (and expected financial implications) being approved at the appropriate level of Government for the agreement concerned.

All offers should be made on an in-principle basis, with the public sector agency communicating that the offer is subject to government approval and may be subject to change to ensure compliance with Wages Policy, the Industrial Relations Policy, the Fair Work Act or other relevant legislation.

Public sector agencies pursuing the secondary pathway should ensure bargaining is undertaken in accordance with the Fair Work Act good faith bargaining requirements, in a timely and efficient manner.

Approval requirements

All proposed enterprise agreements require the approval of Government prior to the commencement of any of the formal approval requirements outlined in the Fair Work Act.

To be approved by Government, a proposed enterprise agreement (whether a Major Agreement or Non-major Agreement) must meet all the conditions specified in Wages Policy. In addition:

  • the public sector agency must verify that it has conducted a comparison of the terms of the Agreement with the relevant Award, and that the Agreement provides that each employee will be Better Off Overall than the relevant Award, within the meaning of the Fair Work Act
  • other requirements from the Public Sector Industrial Relations Policy must be met

The process for seeking Government approval of final agreements under the Framework differs for Major Agreements and Non-major Agreements. Approval of Major Agreements at a high level of Government is required.

Eligible public sector agencies must submit proposed enterprise agreements negotiated under the secondary pathway to Government for approval no later than two months prior to the nominal expiry of the current agreement. A fast track approval process will apply for these agreements. Where Government approval is obtained, agencies must comply with Fair Work Act requirements and seek approval of their agreement from the Fair Work Commission.

Table 3: Final approval - Key responsibilities

Responsibility Action owner
Submission preparation Portfolio Department
Public sector agency
Direct engagement with public sector agency (if needed) Portfolio Department
Public sector agency
IRV and DTF (as required)
Advice on Enterprise Bargaining Framework or application of Industrial Relations Policy IRV
Advice on Wages Policy, cost modelling or financial sustainability issues DTF
Advice on proposed measures to address operational/strategic priorities or the Public Sector Priorities IRV
DTF
Authority, oversight and approval (Major Agreements) Government, with appropriate authorisations for some Non-major Agreements
Introduction Text
The Victorian Government Wages Policy applies to departments and agencies in the public sector.
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Equal Workplaces Advisory Council

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In 2015, Victoria became the first Australian state to develop a Gender Equity Strategy. It's called Safe and Strong. The Equal Workplaces Advisory Council was set up as a part of this strategy.

The council consists of 12 experts from public and private sector organisations. It advises the Minister for Industrial Relations on initiatives that will tackle:

  • the gap in women's pay
  • workforce participation

The Victorian Government has committed to strategies that end the gender pay gap. These strategies reflect principles of gender pay equity developed by the council in its first year.

The council has also:

  • advised government on its pilot gender audit of the Victorian Public Service
  • recommended that listed companies also undertake gender pay audits, and report. They should then report the findings to their board or audit and risk committees
  • given feedback on government projects, such as assessing the value of unpaid work and flexible work arrangements
  • hosted the Women@Work conference

The council has made a public consultation submission about the Victorian Gender Equality Bill. It believes the bill has potential to drive gender pay equity in the Victorian public sector.

Council chair

Liberty Sanger, National Practice Group Leader at Maurice Blackburn Lawyers.

Liberty is also one of Victoria's most respected workplace lawyers.

Council members

  • Karen Batt, Victorian Branch Secretary, Community and Public Sector Union
  • Dr Andrea Carson – Associate Professor, La Trobe University
  • Dr Sara Charlesworth – Distinguished Professor, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology
  • Barbara Cullen – Director, Small Business Victoria, Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions
  • Catherine Dixon – Executive Director, Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission
  • Emma King – Chief Executive Officer, Victorian Council of Social Services
  • Emily Lee-Ack, Chief Executive Officer, Office for Women, Department of Premier and Cabinet
  • Frances Martin – Acting Director, Social and Economic Inclusion, Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions
  • Katherine Smith – Manager, Industry Policy, Victorian Chamber of Commerce and Industry
  • Kimberly White – Workplace Adviser, Australian Industry Group
  • Wilhelmina Stracke – Assistant Secretary, Victorian Trades Hall Council,
  • Lissa Zass – Director, Industrial Relations Victoria, Department of Premier and Cabinet

Victorian Government Gender Equality Pledge

Organisations and individuals can now register a Pledge to show a commitment to actions that will support gender equality in Victorian workplaces. Almost 30 organisations have signed up to the pledge. This includes all Victorian Public Service departments.

Complete the Pledge

Organisations

Businesses of all sizes are encouraged to sign on to the Victorian Government Gender Equality Pledge. We will work with you and your business or organisation to help you implement pledges to:

  • commit to gender pay equity and completing a gender pay audit
  • implement a flexible work policy
  • support a safe and respectful workplace
  • support progression and leadership opportunities for women
  • implement a family violence leave policy

Individuals

Individuals are encouraged to sign on to the Pledge as an ambassador of gender equality in Victoria. We will include you in initiatives to help achieve gender equality in Victoria. Pledge to become an ambassador of gender equality in Victoria by:

  • Championing the cause of gender equality in your workplace and community.
  • Supporting workplace policies of flexible work, safe and respectful workplaces, leadership opportunities for women and family violence leave.

Pledges

Organisations who have already signed pledges to initiate action plans to reduce the gap in their workplaces are:

  • Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions
  • Department of Health and Human Services
  • Department of Premier and Cabinet
  • Department of Justice and Community Safety
  • Victoria Police
  • Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning
  • Department of Education and Training
  • Department of Treasury and Finance
  • Emergency Services and State Superannuation Board
  • Maurice Blackburn Lawyers
  • Energy Australia
  • Deakin University
  • Westpac
  • CoINVEST
  • Wodonga Council
  • Girl Geek Academy
  • Property Promotions.Com
  • Auspicious Arts Projects
  • Eastern Domestic Violence Service
  • Uniting Vic.Tas
  • HESTA
  • Yarra Valley Water
  • Youth Projects
  • La Concierge Pty Ltd
  • QEC
  • Apprenticeships Matter from Greensborough
  • Victorian Council of Social Service
  • CDC Victoria
  • Transdev
Introduction Text
The Equal Workplaces Advisory Council promotes gender pay equity in Victorian workplaces.
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