For use on footer pages etc

Complex image - Design System

Content components

When to use the complex image component

This complex image component allows users to view images in different formats.

It's used to present complicated graphical information like charts and graphs.

The complex image component can be added to the body content of any page.

As well as the image and caption, the component allows a user to:

  • View a high resolution version of the image in full screen.
  • View the image in an alternate format (such as a table).
  • Download an alternate format of the image (such as an Excel file).

Example of a complex image

Title
Sanctions for breach of an SEO
Image
Source
Report 2 - Expert Panel on Terrorism and Violent Extremism
Corresponding data

The diagram shows sanctions for breach of an SEO. Initially they would receive a:

  • warning
  • court facilitated conciliation
  • infringement
  • summary offence

Create a complex image component

Find instructions on how to add a complex image component, by visiting our Publications page.

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Display a complicated image or graphic in an accessible format.
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Chapter pagination - Design System

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When to use chapter pagination

The chapter pagination block provides links to the next and previous chapters when using the Publications template.

It allows a user to read through an entire publication without needing to use the sidebar navigation.

It automatically displays at the end of body content on each chapter page.

Example

A visual example of the chapter pagination block.

Create chapter pagination

Find instructions on how to create a publication with pagination, by visiting our Publications page.

If you are interested in using this component for another purpose, please contact SDP Product Manager Mike Laidlaw:

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Chapter pagination allows your users to easily navigate forwards and backwards through a publication.
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Print and download card - Design System

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Use the print and download card

The card allows users to quickly print a page, or download a separate PDF or Word document version of content.

It appears as the first item in the sidebar.

The card displays automatically on individual pages of a Publication.

Example of the print and download card

A visual example of the Print and Save card.

Create the print and download card

Find instructions on how to add a print and download card to your publication, by visiting our Publications page.

If you are interested in using this component for another purpose, please contact SDP Product Manager Mike Laidlaw:

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The Print and download card allows users to quickly print or save a PDF version of a page.
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DPC travel outcomes report: Daniel Andrews' 2019 travel to China

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Minister The Hon Daniel Andrews MP
Portfolio Premier of Victoria
Countries visited People's Republic of China
Date of travel 25 to 29 April 2019
No of official travel days (including date of departure and date of return) 5
Accompanying ministerial staff

Mr Adam Sims, Director of Media

Mr Marty Mei, Senior Adviser

Accompanied by spouse in an official capacity No
Funding source Premier's Private Office and the Department of Premier and Cabinet
Airfares (including taxes and fees) $29,317.32
Accommodation (including taxes and fees) $2,231.95
Other expenses (includes surface travel and travel allowances) $5,715.25
Travel cost for minister and staff $37,264.52
Are the above costs final and complete? No

Purpose of travel

From 25 to 29 April 2019, I travelled to China to visit Beijing and Nanjing. The purpose of this travel was to represent Victoria as the only Australian sub-national leader at the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation (BRF) in Beijing, and to launch the 40th anniversary celebrations with our sister-state Jiangsu. 

My travel aligns with Victorian Government priorities to cement Victoria’s reputation as China’s gateway to Australia, and demonstrates our commitment to strengthening the mutually beneficial relationship with our largest trading partner.

This was also my first official visit to China since signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) to cooperate on the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), providing opportunities to discuss how this can be leveraged to the greatest benefit to Victoria. 

Benefits of travel to the State of Victoria

This Official visit, my fifth in five years, built on the significant relationship the Victorian Government has developed with China compounded through annual visits and cooperation across a range of sectors. 

Victoria’s invitation to attend the second BRF, having attended the first in 2017, was confirmation of our reputation as the state leading Australian engagement in China. 

Benefits of the trip to Victoria include: 

  • positioning Victoria for future BRI opportunities, particularly under the BRI MoU, and promoting our strengths and capabilities to key Chinese Government officials
  • promoting Victoria as a trusted partner for trade and investment, and for cooperation in priority areas, including infrastructure
  • further strengthening Victoria’s relationship with Jiangsu by launching the 40th anniversary celebrations of our sister-state relationship and meeting with senior Jiangsu Government leadership
  • further strengthening Victoria’s reputation as Australia’s gateway to Asia and a global leader in Asia capabilities

Attended the Belt and Road Forum 

My attendance at the BRF positioned Victoria as a leader in BRI engagement and provided a platform to explore Victoria’s future participation in BRI opportunities.

The BRF is one of China’s highest profile economic and diplomatic events, hosted by President Xi Jinping. The 2019 BRF was attended by over 5,000 delegates from across the world, including 37 national leaders.

I represented Victoria as the only Australian State Government attendee, promoting our strengths in infrastructure and liveability on a global stage and highlighting our capabilities to assist with China’s Greater Bay Area Initiative (GBA). 

Key engagements at the BRF included: 

  • meeting with Mr Ning Jizhe, Vice Chairman of the NDRC, to deepen connections between Victoria and the NDRC and discuss opportunities for Victoria to participate in projects under the BRI and GBA
  • meeting with Mr Zeng Peiyan, Chairman of China Centre for International Economic Exchanges and former Vice Premier of China, to position Victoria as a leader in engaging with China, and to promote Victoria as an attractive investment and business destination
  • meeting with Ms Carrie Lam, Chief Executive of Hong Kong, to strengthen the relationship between Victoria and Hong Kong in infrastructure, including opportunities for Victoria to partner with Hong Kong on elements of the GBA

Strengthened existing partnerships

I deepened Victoria’s bilateral partnerships with Jiangsu Province, our sister-state of 40 years, through a number of high-level engagements, including:

  • meetings with Mr Lou Qinjian, Party Secretary of Jiangsu, and Mr Wu Zhenglong, Governor of Jiangsu, to reiterate Victoria’s commitment to its sister-state relationship with Jiangsu and discuss plans for the 40th anniversary year, including the 17th Victoria Jiangsu Joint Economic Committee and Leadership Exchange (VJJEC)
  • attending the launch of the 40th anniversary celebrations of our sister-state relationship with the Governor of Jiangsu, building on the relationships with Jiangsu leadership and announcing a reciprocal artist exchange between Victoria and Jiangsu

Next steps

Following my successful visit, a number of actions have commenced and will continue to be progressed. These include:

  • working with China’s Consulate-General in Melbourne to secure tangible outcomes for Victoria in the BRI, under our MoU with the NDRC
  • hosting delegations from Jiangsu, including senior leadership, for the 17th VJJEC and 
  • 40th anniversary celebrations later in 2019
  • launching the Victoria-Jiangsu artist exchange commemorating our 40th sister-state anniversary 
  • working to establish Victoria’s involvement in the GBA and promoting Victoria’s infrastructure and liveability capabilities 
  • continuing to engage with Chinese companies interested in assisting in the delivery of Victoria’s infrastructure agenda
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Information about costs, purpose and outcomes of the Premier's travel to China in April 2019.
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Behavioural insights case study: ensuring children get the right support

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In public policy some of the areas with the greatest possible impact are also those with the most difficult problems. Making progress on complex problems generally requires:

  • Behaviour change by a group of individuals.
  • Efforts from multiple stakeholders, often with different opinions about how these problems should be solved.
  • Intricate interdependencies, spanning across work areas and accountabilities.

The protection of vulnerable children is a complex problem with multiple stakeholders. The Child Protection Reporter Support project is helping to tackle this issue through a collaborative interdepartmental project and by using a behavioural insights approach to understand the problem.

The problem

Demand within the Child Protection system has grown significantly over the last decade.

The education sector is a particularly important stakeholder. Teachers and other school staff interact with children regularly and are often the first to notice if a child is at risk or needs support.

This project sought to better understand the decision making process of professionals from the education sector, Child Protection Intake and Child FIRST lead agencies for identification of whether a child is in need of support or protection and appropriate response.

Project objectives

  1. Help children and families receive the right support at the right time.
  2. Support Child Protection, Child FIRST and education professionals to use their areas of expertise in a coordinated way to meet the needs of children and families.

What we found

Diagnose

Data is an important tool for policy makers. It can give clear indications of inputs, outputs and outcomes. But quantitative data alone cannot explain why people are behaving in a certain way. Field-based research enables us to examine the daily experiences of professionals, and how small details that are not often incorporated into traditional policy making can produce different outcomes in practice. This allows us to:

  • Understand the context of a problem.
  • Observe behaviours that people may not think are important enough to mention in interviews.
  • Give frontline professionals the opportunity to contribute directly to the decision making process.

Fieldwork and observation

Qualitative research is a key input into policy making and service design. Unlike traditional consultation, observing people while they are doing a task rather than having them describe the task to you provides a more fulsome understanding of how a process really works. When we are familiar with something we often don’t comment on steps that have become second nature. We are surrounded by information and our brains automatically filter most of it out to allow us to focus on the things that we need to make a decision. It is then difficult for us to articulate these steps; we have simply put them to the back of our minds.

Approximately 180 hours of fieldwork and consultations by the cross-departmental team were conducted with Child Protection Practitioners, education professionals and Child FIRST lead agencies to understand:

  • How a child or young person’s risk is first recognised and understood.
  • How professionals respond when a child or young person is identified as at risk.
  • How supported by each other education professionals, Child Protection Practitioners and Child FIRST Practitioners feel to meet the child’s needs.

This fieldwork provided rich qualitative evidence about what possible actions would help to make the system work better.

For example, professionals reflected that they don’t always receive feedback on the results of the reports into the Child Protection system. Behavioural science literature suggests that timely feedback on a decision or action is more likely to change behaviour the next time a similar decision or action is required. We are currently considering how this feedback could be provided.

“We’re the ones seeing the kids five days a week and we have to support the child when you [Child Protection] go.”

~ Education professional

“All professional reporters should be advised of the outcome of their call.”

~ Child Protection Practitioner

What's next?

This project is now moving into its next phase. We will be able to confidently propose policy directions, knowing that impacted frontline and policy professionals have contributed to their development throughout the decision making process.

Thanks

We thank our partners the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Education and Training and the frontline professionals who generously gave their time and expertise.

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This project used behavioural insights to support the protection of vulnerable children.
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Cyber security standards and guidelines

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Victorian Protective Data Security Framework and Standards

The Victorian Protective Data Security Framework and Standards (VPDSF) is the overall scheme for managing protective data security risks in Victoria’s public sector.

The VPDSF consists of the:

You can contact the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner for advice on the applicability of the VPDSF to your Victorian Government organisation.

Australian Government Information Security Manual

This Information Security Manual (ISM) helps organisations to protect their information and systems from cyber threats. 

These guidelines are intended for:

  • chief information security officers (CISOs)
  • chief information officers (CIOs)
  • cyber security professionals
  • information technology managers

Access the Australian Government Information Security Manual (produced by the Australian Cyber Security Centre.

The 'Essential Eight'

The Australian Cyber Security Centre has compiled a list of mitigation strategies, known as The Essential Eight that organisations can use as starting points to improve their cyber resilience. These should be implemented as a baseline where possible.

Implementing these 8 strategies proactively can be more cost-effective in terms of time, money and effort than responding to a successful large-scale cyber security incident.

The Essential Eight are:

  1. Application whitelisting - Whitelist approved and trusted programs to prevent the execution of unapproved or malicious programs from executing.
  2. Patching applications - Perform regular patching/updating of applications in your network.
  3. Office macros - Configure Microsoft Office products to block the execution of un-trusted macros.
  4. Harden user applications - Tightly control applications that have the ability to perform unwanted or potentially vulnerable actions.
  5. Restrict administrative privileges - Restrict administrative privilege for operating systems and applications based on user duties.
  6. Patch operating systems – Routinely patch and upgrade your operating systems to the latest versions.
  7. Use multi-factor authentication - Set up multi-factor authentication to provide higher authentication assurance for privileged, power and remote user access.
  8. Backup daily – Create regular backups of your most important data and configuration settings to help you recover quickly from a disruption. Keep backups on a device that is not connected to your network.

Cloud security guidelines

The cloud security guidelines are intended to support Victorian Government organisations in making informed, risk-based decisions about the use of cloud services.

They are targeted at general management, cyber security and IT security practitioners. They assume basic knowledge of cloud computing and enterprise security architectures.

Download the guidelines:

These guidelines were developed by the Department of Premier and Cabinet Cyber Security Unit for use by Victorian Government organisations.

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Guidelines on using labour hire and professional services

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From July 2019, the following guidelines come into effect for government public service bodies and public entities that are mandated to comply with Victorian Government Purchasing Board (VGPB) policies:

These guidelines contain updated decision-making and approval requirements for labour hire and professional services use.

Who has to follow these rules

To find out if your organisation is mandated to follow VGPB policies, visit the VGPB Scope of Polices page.

We encourage organisations that are not required to comply with these guidelines to implement them as good practice, where applicable.

When the new rules start

These guidelines come into effect from July 2019. Mandated entities must ensure they have transitioned to and are fully compliant with the new rules by 1 October 2019. 

In the interim period between 14 July 2019 and 1 October 2019, the following approval measures for labour hire and consulting engagements will apply for all mandated entities:

  • All requests to use labour hire must be approved by a Deputy Secretary (or equivalent) at a minimum.
  • All proposals to engage consultants must be approved by a Secretary (or equivalent).

More information on these interim measures can be found in the ‘Compliance with the Guidelines’ section of the new guidelines.

Contracts these guidelines apply to

These guidelines apply to all labour hire and professional services engagements made under:

  • the Staffing Services State Purchase Contract (SPC)
  • the Professional Advisory Services SPC
  • the Legal Services Panel SPC
  • the Marketing Services register
  • the eServices Panel

Application of service categories

These guidelines apply to an engagement even if it's with a provider that is not on a current SPC panel or register, if it applies to one of the service categories in the SPCs.

Exemptions

These guidelines don't apply to professional services to undertake, service or advise on built environment and infrastructure work, such as construction, infrastructure, engineering or architecture.

Other exemptions under the Public Administration Act 2004 (Vic) are described in the guidelines.

Why we've introduced new rules

A 2018 review found that there has been a significant year-on-year increase in the use of labour hire and professional services in the Victorian Government.

We're committed to secure employment practices and building the internal capability of the VPS. To do this, we're challenging current thinking and practices around use of labour hire and professional services in the VPS. The goal is to change the culture and practices to:

  • reduce the use of external suppliers for certain kinds of contracts
  • build internal capability
  • support secure employment practices

Help with the guidelines

If you're uncertain about how to implement these guidelines or their applicability to your organisation or circumstances, speak to your organisation’s procurement team.

Department of Premier and Cabinet will be monitoring and supporting the transition to these new rules.

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About the Cyber Security Unit

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About the Cyber Security Unit

The Victorian Government Cyber Security Unit (CSU) supports the Victorian Government to prepare, prevent and respond to cyber security incidents. 

We aim to:

  • reduce the scope, severity and impact of cyber security incidents 
  • create a resilient cyber security environment for the Victorian Government 
  • coordinate cross-government action

We provide the following to the whole of Victorian Government:

  • expert cyber security threat advice
  • strategic guidance
  • risk analysis and assurance

We're working on achieving the 23 actions of Victoria's first Cyber Security Strategy.

We collaborate widely with interstate, intrastate, industry and federal entities.

Our 24/7 Cyber Incident Response Service (CIRS):

  • coordinates government responses for cyber security incidents.
  • provides cyber threat intelligence
  • provides remote and onsite services

About the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO)

The role of the CISO is to:

  • deliver the the 23 actions of Victorian Government Cyber security Strategy
  • oversee Victorian Government’s response to the cyber threat
  • develop best practice
  • provide assurance
  • report internally on state’s cyber security status
  • coordinate cross-government action. 

The CISO doesn't replace the individual responsibilities and accountability within each government agency. 

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We support the Victorian Government to prepare, prevent and respond to cyber security incidents. 
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Report or respond to a cyber incident

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Cyber incidents can affect any organisation at any time.

The most important thing is to act quickly. The sooner you respond, the better you can contain the problem and prevent harm.

The most common cyber incidents affecting Victorian Government organisations are:

  • phishing - spam emails that try to trick you
  • malware incidents (including ransomware) - virus software installed on your computer
  • denial of service attacks - where hackers block users from accessing a service they usually have access to
  • data breaches - caused by malicious cyber-attacks or human error

Report a cyber incident

Victorian Government organisations must report cyber incidents to the Victorian Government Cyber Incident Response Service.

Our service operates 24/7, 365 days a year and provides Victorian Government organisations with expert incident response support

Examples of cyber incidents that must be reported

All cyber security incidents that disrupt government systems or services must be reported even if the impact is minimal. This includes:

  • an unexplained outage (e.g. system become unavailable or not working as expected)
  • a compromise to government information (e.g. data or privacy breach)
  • cyber incidents affecting critical infrastructure and essential services providers.

The Cyber Incident Response Service was established under the Victorian Government Cyber Security Strategy 2016-20. It's funded by the Department of Premier and Cabinet.

Respond to a cyber incident

If you believe you have experienced a cyber incident, contact your IT team (or your IT Security team, if you have one). Your IT experts should be able to help you respond to the incident.

If you need further assistance, contact the Victorian Government Cyber Incident Response Service:

If you are a private industry organisation, you can request assistance from the Australian Cyber Security Centre on 1300 CYBER1 (24/7).

Cyber incident response steps

  1. Investigate whether a problem has occurred. Talk with staff and review logs to determine whether a compromise has occurred.
  2. Fix the problem. Remove any viruses from your networks, or close identified gaps in your network. For example, remove an infected device from a network; take systems or databases offline while you investigate the incident.
  3. Double-check the problem is gone. Scan your networks to confirm that no viruses remain, or that gaps have been properly closed before restoring systems/services to operation.
  4. Review your response. What worked well and what didn't during the response process? Note the lessons learnt and update your incident response plan.

Cyber incident response plan

For more information about responding to cyber incidents, download a copy of the cyber incident response plan template for Victorian Government organisations:

Ask for help if you are unsure about how to respond to a cyber incident by contacting the Victorian Government Cyber Incident Response Service:

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